Sat, Dec 16, 2017

Promoting an international perspective in American psychology

8 Jan 2015

Since 2013, the Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP) has renewed its commitment to the APA’s mission to excel as a principal leader and global partner promoting psychological knowledge and methods to facilitate the resolution of personal, societal and global challenges in diverse, multicultural and international contexts;

Promoting an international perspective in American psychology : Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP) review of 2014 activities. 

Since 2013, the Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP) has renewed its commitment to the APA’s mission to excel as a principal leader and global partner promoting psychological knowledge and methods to facilitate the resolution of personal, societal and global challenges in diverse, multicultural and international contexts. Consistent with APA’s aspirations, CIRP identified two major priorities:

1.Promoting an international perspective within APA.

2.Promoting an international perspective in graduate programming in psychology. 

Our work began with consideration of the variation in terminology and perspectives about what constitutes an international perspective. One of CIRP’s first steps in 2014 was to establish a subcommittee that would address the question of, “What are international competencies for psychologists?” The subcommittee is in the process of identifying critical competencies related to psychology research, practice, teaching, service and policy. It is expected that the outcomes of this work will influence how we address our major priorities. An initial report from the subcommittee will be made at APA’s 2015 National Multicultural Conference and Summit, to be held in Atlanta in January. Given the 2015 theme, “Psychology Without Borders: Reaching Within, Reaching Out,” the summit provides an opportune context for the presentation and discussion of what constitutes "international" competencies to guide our work as we "reach out,"  and how those are distinct from "multicultural" competencies applicable as we "reach within."

By Bonnie Kaul Nastasi, PhD, and Sissy Hatzichristou

See more: http://www.apa.org/international/pi/2014/12/promoting-american.aspx

 

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